Ambassadors

The BUSOG Ambassadors

The BUSOG ambassadors act as a portal between the national BUSOG committee and medical school students. An ambassadors is recruited from each UK University. Key roles include advertising The BUSOG events and opportunities, completing monthly tasks and spreading the enthuasiam and sense of community for all this O&G!

Let’s meet the 2018-19 team. If you have any questions do not hesitate to contact your medical school’s ambassador, or any member of the national BUSOG committee.

The BUSOG

Ambassadors

Nadia Crolla

Aberdeen Medical School

‘Choosing a specialty in medicine is a very tricky combination of finding an area that you love the medical content of and discovering a mode of practice that matches your personal skills profile. This is why for me, from an early stage in medical school, O&G has been the obvious choice! What other specialty involves medicine and surgery, elective and emergency, the healthy and the unhealthy, the young and the old?’

n.crolla.15@aberdeen.ac.uk

Vacant Post

Aston Medical school

We’re on the look out for an ambassador from the soon to be established Aston Medical School. If you are interested, please drop Kayleigh, our Secretary, an email: busogsecretary@gmail.com

Ryanna Naa Kleshie Bart-Koranteng

Barts & The London Medical School

‘There truly is no other specialty specifically catered to women’s health where decisions made both on the wards and in theatre can have such a significant impact during pivotal moments in patients’ lives. Especially in recent years where previously taboo topics centred around women’s health are now being openly discussed.’

r.bart-koranteng@smd14.qmul.ac.uk

Sara Wynne

Birmingham medical school

‘The combination of medicine and surgery, and the ever evolving technologies and innovations which arise within the fields of O&G, never fail to amaze and inspire me. Caring for not only one life, but two (or more!) within obstetrics is also such a great honour.’

SJW390@student.bham.ac.uk

Jessie Shaw

Brighton & Sussex medical school

‘Obstetrics is the only area of medicine to care for two individuals simultaneously, where the health and treatment of one individual has a direct impact upon the other. A doctor in O&G must support women of all ages through potentially scary, emotional and intimate diagnoses; and the skill of making patients feel comfortable discussing personal issues is something I would love to master.’

j.shaw1@uni.bsms.ac.uk

Harriet Miles

BRISTOL MEDICAL SCHOOL

‘O+G is the best of all worlds! I love the mix of surgery, medicine, emergency, and teaching opportunities the specialty offers. From managing a difficult birth to discussing stress incontinence in afternoon clinic, you have the chance to assist women in all stages of life. As society and the modern woman continues to change, I find it interesting how options for women will adapt and hopefully grow. It makes for a stimulating and interesting profession.’

hm14228@my.bristol.ac.uk

Vacant

buckingham medical school

We’re on the look out for an ambassador from Buckingham Medical School. If you are interested, please drop Kayleigh, our Secretary, an email: busogsecretary@gmail.com

Eman Butt

cambridge medical school

‘No other specialty gives the opportunity to be a surgeon and a physician and to save two lives for the price of one. The subject of gynaecology also pairs with obstetrics perfectly- it allows the practitioner to follow patients’ reproductive health from infancy to old age.’

eb597@cam.ac.uk

Katherine Carnegie

Cardiff medical school

‘A career in O&G offers the freedom to work in medicine and surgery alike, as well as involvement in both chronic and acute care. To me, O&G is particularly valuable as a specialty as obstetricians provide support to parents and families at one of the most significant points in their lives, and gynaecologists don’t only treat clinical problems, but also women’s sense of self.’

CarnegieKS@cardiff.ac.uk

Anna Crawford

Dundee medical school

‘I love that Obstetrics and Gynaecology are combined as I love being able to interact with people of all ages, from all walks of life. I particularly find the gynaecological surgeries fascinating requiring intricate surgical skills and detail. It combines elective procedures with emergency situations which excites me about the specialty further.’

a.y.crawford@dundee.ac.uk

Amy Shearer

Edinburgh medical school

‘My interest in O&G started while I was studying developmental genetics and since completing my O&G placement I am yet to imagine another area of medicine which could interest me more! For many women it will be the first time they have been in hospital since they were born and I think it is such a privilege to be able to provide the care they need through this time. I also love the fact that it is a much needed specialty abroad and that it encompasses both medicine and surgery- the best of both worlds!’

amyshearer10@hotmail.co.uk

 

Lydia Newman

Exeter medical school

‘O&G uniquely offers the chance to make a difference to women’s lives in many dimensions, from teenagers and pregnancy, to the elderly and gynaecology oncology. I have developed an interest in research after working on a study investigating the role of the immune system in facilitating embryo implantation and early pregnancy.’

lmn203@exeter.ac.uk

 

Vacant

glasgow medical school

We’re on the look out for an ambassador from Glasgow Medical School. If you are interested, please drop Kayleigh, our Secretary, an email: busogsecretary@gmail.com

Anne-Victoire Le Fur

Hull york medical school

‘The variability of an O&G doctor’s working life has irrevocably drawn me in and I can’t think of any job I want to do more. I have been greatly influenced by my mother, who is a Sexual Health and Family Planning specialist- she first interested me in the wide field of women’s health by engaging me in conversations about what she did at work.’

hyal7@hyms.ac.uk

 

Dania Badran

Imperial medical school

‘O&G has an harmonious balance of medicine and surgery, allowing you to deal with a variety of problems which are often in conjugation with other specialties as well! I am personally drawn to the way in which women’s health issues have deeply psychological implications.’

dania.badran15@imperial.ac.uk

 

Jacob Oguntimehin

Keele medical school

‘My curiosity for O&G was ignited before my entry into medical school by the documentary, ‘One born every minute’. Not only was I gripped by the miracle of childbirth, but also by the complications which can take place. I was fascinated by the role of the obstetrician in addressing these complications and the multifaceted nature of the career. I loved the inclusion of both medicine and surgery. I loved the great deal of patient contact. I also loved the multidisciplinary nature of the healthcare team!’

w4m96@students.keele.ac.uk

Charlotte Burford

King's College London medical school

‘I love O&G because it combines the best aspects of medicine and surgery and out of all my clinical placements I found it offered the greatest variety in terms of presentations and pathologies. I particularly like the mix of both acute medicine, such as obstetric emergencies, and longer-term patient care, such as management of gynaecological oncology patients.’

charlotte.burford@kcl.ac.uk

 

Drew Hawtin

Lancaster medical school

‘The diverse nature of O+G is what makes the specialty most appealing to me as there are so many aspects to the job where you can truly make a difference to women’s lives.  It is a specialty that has the ability to make every day unpredictable. Although at times being an O+G doctor will be challenging, it would be extremely rewarding and a privilege to be involved in such significant and memorable life events for patients.’

d.hawtin@lancaster.ac.uk

 

 

Sammie Mak

Leeds medical school

‘It wasn’t until third year at medical school that I realised everything I found exciting and challenging all fell into one specialty; O&G.

The impact that you can have on your patients and the amount of support that you can provide for them is huge.’

um14sm@leeds.ac.uk

Tanushree Motiwale

Leicester medical school

‘O&G is a fast paced work environment and very hands on; the stakes are high but it is also exceptionally rewarding. You get to be a part of one of the most special periods of your patient’s lives. You help to bring a new life into the world. It’s the only specialty in which you start with one patient but end up with two or sometimes even more!’

tm235@student.le.ac.uk

 

Beth Harrison

Liverpool medical school

‘You know you have found your speciality when studying it doesn’t feel like work!
The care of women in the UK has improved massively over the last century and I am passionate about interventions to improve women’s health education – such as contraception and lifestyle medicine.’

B.L.Harrison@student.liverpool.ac.uk

 

 

James Morrall

Manchester medical school

‘Directly significant for 50% of the population and, through reproductive health, pivotal for many more, O&G is perhaps the most important speciality for mankind.

Obstetrics allows us the privilege of being present at two of the most significant moments in a person’s life – when they are born, and when they become a parent. We have all relied on it once, and many of us will rely on it again.’

james.morrall@student.manchester.ac.uk

Emily Phillips

Newcastle medical school

‘From being able to support a woman through a complicated pregnancy so she can enjoy it, to being able to offer management options to women affected by long-term gynae problems that hugely impact their lives, to reassurance before an emergency Caesarean, O&G never fails to surprise me with how much of a positive impact good care and communication can have on a patient and their family at key points in their lives.’

E.R.Phillips1@newcastle.ac.uk

 

Vacant

nottingham medical school

We’re on the look out for an ambassador from Glasgow Medical School. If you are interested, please drop Kayleigh, our Secretary, an email: busogsecretary@gmail.com

 

Christine Shi

oxford medical school

‘O&G is a blend of medicine and surgery, offering a fantastic variety of day-to-day work. I aim to get a foundation year post in O&G once qualified with the hope that my experiences as a medical student will marry up to that as a doctor.’

christine.shi@gtc.ox.ac.uk

Harry Phillips

Plymouth medical school

‘The continuity of care in O&G and helping women at some of the most special times of their lives always struck a chord with me and that is something I have only built on since starting medical school.’

harry.phillips@students.plymouth.ac.uk

 

Katrina Freimane

Queen's University Belfast medical school

‘For me, Obstetrics and Gynaecology is the perfect medical specialty. I love how rewarding a field it is, encompassing skill, intellectually challenging clinical cases and also the privilege of seeing the beginnings of families.’

katrinazfreimane@gmail.com

 

Jessica Giles

Sheffield medical school

 

‘When you find something that inspires you to build a career, you want to tell the world about it. This is how I feel about Obstetrics and Gynaecology. It is an area of medicine that excites me.’

jaegiles1@sheffield.ac.uk

Tazneem Chowdhury

southampton medical school

‘A career in O&G is an emotional rollercoaster, but a huge privilege to be part of such a significant event in someone’s life. It’s a fast-paced and unpredictable speciality, and I am really excited to learn more about it as I progress through my career.’

tazneem1@gmail.com

 

Vacant

St Andrew's medical school

We’re on the look out for an ambassador from Glasgow Medical School. If you are interested, please drop Kayleigh, our Secretary, an email: busogsecretary@gmail.com

Sofia Tierney

st george's medical school

‘O&G is a highly emotive career, that provides firm support to women during times of immense joy, sadness, and when they are feeling most vulnerable. For me, O&G is the best example of team work, with all staff working together to piece one intricate puzzle that can suddenly change at a moment’s notice.’

m1401389@sgul.ac.uk

Zoe Slack

Swansea medical school

‘O&G requires integration of almost every area of medicine; from cardiology, respiratory and paediatrics to oncology, psychiatry and geriatrics. It requires hands on, practical medicine as well as a sensitive, attentive clinician who is able to attend to their patient throughout their hospital experience; from presenting complaint to medicinal treatment to surgery.’

Z.B.SLACK.900960@swansea.ac.uk

 

Sophie Smith

UCL medical school

‘I am passionate about Obstetrics and Gynaecology as it covers such a broad and important area of medicine and surgery. The processes, diseases and life events encompassed in the specialty directly affect around half the world’s population (and indirectly affect the rest). These global issues have been brought closer to home by the problems and experiences of family and friends, inspiring me to use my training to help.’

sophie.smith.14@ucl.ac.uk

Ambika Puri

UCLAN medical school

‘I believe that obstetricians have one of the most rewarding jobs being able to deliver babies and share that special moment with families on a daily basis.’

apuri1@uclan.ac.uk

Lauren Mcquillan

UEA medical school

 
‘Childbirth is possibly the most important time in a woman’s life and to be able to assist and witness that journey where she brings new life into the world is truly a privilege afforded to few.
The combination of medicine and surgery in obs and gynae makes it both an exciting and challenging specialty which appeals to me.’

L.Mcquillan@uea.ac.uk

 

Jessica Stonestreet

Warwick medical school

‘I really love obs and gynae because what originally sounded like a narrow speciality actually has so many options. Labour ward has all the excitement of an acute specialty whilst you still have the rewarding continuity of following patients through antenatal care and with their gynaecological problems.’

J.Stonestreet@warwick.ac.uk

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